FRESH AIR SYSTEMS FAQs

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In colder climates, where home heating is essential, the Heat Recovery Ventilator (HRV) is the proper choice. The HRV keeps the home supplied with a steady flow of fresh outdoor air. As stale, warm air is expelled, the heat recovery core warms the incoming fresh, colder air before it is distributed throughout the home. The result is a constant supply of fresh air, no uncomfortable drafts and greater comfort. In addition to heat recovery and improved air quality, the HRV provides necessary ventilation while controlling excess humidity.

Energy Recovery Ventilator (ERV): Ideal for warmer climates and high-humidity environments. Even though the energy recovery ventilator (ERV) is suitable for colder climates, it is usually associated with warmer climate homes where humidity control is important. The ERV recovers heat; however, it also recovers the energy trapped in moisture, which greatly improves the overall recovery efficiency. The ERV process is as follows: In humid climates and air conditioned homes, when it is more humid outside than inside, the ERV limits the amount of moisture coming into your home. In dry climates and humidified homes, when the humidity level is reversed, the ERV limits the amount of moisture expelled from your home. 
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The air circulation within your home may be good, but more likely the air quality is poor. It's damp, stuffy, or making you sick. Replacing appliances such as a furnace or water heater, installing new windows or adding siding to a home changes the air leakage rate. Any improvements made to a home that reduces airflow in a house may result in insufficient natural ventilation. Excess moisture destroys your windows and building structure. Mold, mildew, carbon monoxide and chemical pollutants are harmful to human health. You need to build tight, but more important, ventilate right.
 
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Healthy indoor air requires you add a mixture of regular fresh outdoor air. Tighter building construction causes negative pressure when bath fans, kitchen range vents, clothes dryers and other exhaust equipment are in use. Your vent fans suffer. They will not be effective and motors will wear out more quickly.
 
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Ventilators do not recover the energy (heat or cooler temperature) from the air being exhausted. An ERV and HRV unit transfers the temperature to the fresh air being drawn into the home. Reheating or cooling costs become minimal in comparison to heating or cooling air being drawn in through cracks and leaks in your building structure.
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A Fresh Air System cannot be as effective if the high levels of humidity generated by today's shower and tub systems is allowed to dissipate throughout the entire house. It should be removed at the source by running a bathroom exhaust fan for 20-30 minutes after each shower. Your bathrooms should be properly measured and fans for each room must be chosen with proper CFM (Cubic Feet of air per Minute). Then the house's general ventilating system can control the moisture.
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It is not recommended that you do this. When a Fresh Air System (FAS) has been properly sized and balanced, any vent fan that operates during operation of the FAS will unbalance that system, rendering it ineffective. The high humidity from the bathroom, along with any odors, may be circulated throughout the rest of the house.
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A vent system designed to provide fresh air must provide approximately one-third (0.35) air changes per hour. To calculate the required minimum CFM, divide the square footage of your house by 20, or consult a qualified HVAC contractor to properly size your building.
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Low voltage wiring (4-conductor telephone-type cable) is required to install the humidity controls, which activate and operate the ventilation equipment. The ERV must have one of the Central controls. The VT3W model activates the ERV by sensing pollutants (not humidity). There are also 20 minute push-button timers available to activate the units for short intervals rather than operating in a "constant on" mode.
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Generally it should be installed by trained HVAC technicians where your furnace and A/C is because proper sizing and balancing of the system is critical. The unit must be installed in areas that do not get below 40°F. A floor or pipe drain must be available.
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Because the unit is equipped with drains to eliminate humidity from the air, the unit must be installed in an area that does not get below 40° F. A floor or pipe drain must be provided.
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For indoor pool, yes. Broan offers a complete line of Light Commercial units for Residential and Commercial applications. The B1600705 (400-700 CFM) offered in the Light Commercial line is specifically designed and constructed to handle the high humidity and chemical laden air generated within small pools water surface between 400 to 900 square feet. For Spas, it requires special design. In both cases we suggest that you contact an HVAC professional.
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No. It is not possible to have your furnace turn your ventilator on due to the electronic circuitry. However, it is possible to wire just your furnace blower to operate while your ventilator is running so that the most effective ventilation of your whole house is possible. If you are in the habit of closing bedroom doors or other rooms you may have "dead air pockets" in your home. The furnace blower helps the fresh, dry air reach the rooms farthest from the ventilator.
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Recent studies show that natural ventilation (leaks and cracks) does not provide adequate fresh air into houses. Energy efficient construction has challenged us to overcome the bad health effects and damaging humidity that tightly constructed buildings have caused. Natural ventilation does not provide adequate ventilation to control these contaminants.
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Your system can be direct-ducted. That is, an independent ducting system can be installed in new construction. This may not work well in old construction. Your unit can be installed in your existing forced air furnace duct, which simplifies the installation in old construction. Both types of installation require a 6" inlet and a 6" exhaust port.